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Living History

A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America’s first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey’s Lady’s Book the most influential women’s magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem “Mary’s Lamb” and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale.

Living History

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

Living History

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

American History

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

American History, Living History, Music History and Appreciation, New Hampshire History

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women’s rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice—most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

New Hampshire History

In 1835, abolitionists opened one of the nation's first integrated schools in Canaan, NH, attracting eager African-American students from as far away as Boston, Providence, and New York City. Outraged community leaders responded by raising a mob that dragged the academy building off its foundation and ran the African-American students out of town.

American History, Living History

Distinctly different paths led Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd to Springfield, Illinois, where they met, married and began a family. The years that followed their move to the White House were filled with personal and national crises. Steve and Sharon Wood portray President and Mrs. Lincoln in this living history program, telling stories of their early lives and the challenges they faced during this turbulent time in our country's history.

American History, New Hampshire History

One of the most interesting aspects of the American Revolution is the role played by African Americans in the fight for independence. Both free African Americans and those that were enslaved were key in manning state militias and Continental Army units, as well as serving on the high seas in the Navy and on privately armed ships. Indeed, their service to the colonies was crucial in a conflict that lasted nearly seven years.

American History

African-American soldiers and sailors saw extensive action during World War II in nearly every theatre of operations. Though few in number, African-American submariners played an important role in manning the navy submarines, many built at Portsmouth, which wrought havoc against Japanese naval and merchant vessels. Limited by the U.S.

American History

"All Aboard the Titanic" responds to people's enduring fascination with this historic, and very human, event.  Including and moving beyond the physical facts of the story, Ted Zalewski explores the personal experiences of selected passengers and crew, including those with New Hampshire affiliations, emphasizing examples of individual courage and triumph.

 

Adam Boyce, a 10th-generation Vermonter and lifelong student of history, has been a popular Humanities to Go presenter since 2005. Beginning in 1991, when Boyce started dancing, fiddling, calling and playing the piano, he has made a study of nearly every aspect of traditional New England dancing and music history. Boyce has also been a regular on fiddle contest circuits as a judge, piano accompanist, and as a competitor.

photo of Steve Blunt

Steve Blunt is an award-winning musician and storyteller with over 20 years experience in education and the arts. He has been selected seven times as a grant-funded artist for the NH State Library's "Kids, Books, and the Arts" program and is committed to sharing traditional folklore and history with audiences of all ages. He holds an MA in Teaching of English from Teachers College at Columbia.

Margo Burns is the 10th-generation great-granddaughter of Rebecca Nurse, who was hanged in Salem in 1692 on the charge of witchcraft. She is the project manager and an associate editor of Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt, published in 2009 by Cambridge University Press. This work is the definitive collection of transcriptions of the legal records of the episode.

Bob Cottrell holds an MA from the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture in Delaware. The founding director of the Remick Country Doctor Museum in Tamworth, he is now the Curator of the Henney History Room at the Conway Public Library, a Board member at the Conway Historical Society, and President ex-officio of the Tamworth Historical Society. He serves as an independent history and museum consultant.

photo of Richard Adams Carey

Richard Adams Carey is a writer whose byline has appeared in magazines ranging from Alaska to Yankee. He is the author of four award-winning books of literary nonfiction, including Raven's Children: An Alaskan Culture at Twilight (a New York Public Library Book to Remember) and Against the Tide: The Fate of the New England Fisherman (the New Hampshire Literary Prize for Nonfiction).

Ann-Maria Contarino has taught in the English department at Saint Anselm College for over 20 years. She also currently serves as academic counselor and coordinator of the writing center at the college. In 2016 and 2017, she served as one of the facilitators on the Manchester team of From Troy to Baghdad: Dialogues on the Experience of War, and in 2017 trained the facilitators for the next phase of the program.

photo of Paul Christesen

Paul Christesen holds a BA in History and Classics from Dartmouth College and an MA and PhD in Ancient History from Columbia University. He is an associate professor in the Department of Classics at Dartmouth College, where his teaching and scholarship center around social history, with a particular focus on athletics and economics. Christesen has written two books, Ancient Greek History and Olympic Victor Lists, and twenty articles.

photo of Stephen Collins

Stephen Collins is a Shakespearean trained actor with 40 years of theatrical experience under his belt. He has performed as Walt Whitman over 1,000 times and been met with rave reviews. Mr. Collins’ performance does not just deliver the poetry; he brings the poet to life on the stage. The show conveys an understanding of the impact and the reactions of the characters to their respective times, giving the audience not just a performance, but an experience.

photo of Marya Danihel

Marya Danihel has long been fascinated with the window afforded on 19th-century life by popular songs of the era. As a singer and actress, she also revels in their charming melodies, heartfelt poetry, and wry humor. Her lecture/concerts have been featured at many of New England’s historic houses and museums, including the Longfellow National Historic Site, Boston’s Old South Meeting House, and Strawbery Banke Museum.

Mohamed Defaa is certified by the International Center for Educational and Cultural Consulting in Lyon, France. He earned an MA in Communication and Expression at the University Mohamed V in Rabat, Morocco, and a BA in French Language and Literature from the University Ibn Tofail in Kénitra, Morocco. Defaa has served as an assistant professor of Communication and Cultural Expression at the University Hassan the Second in Casablanca, Morocco, and a college instructor in New Hampshire and Massachusetts.