Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

 

View a PDF of our quarterly publication, Engage!

For previous editions of our newsletter, click here.

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Nashua First Baptist Church | Nashua, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

New Hampshire Institute of Art French Hall | Manchester, NH

Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, with special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several sample comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II.

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Pease Public Library | Plymouth, NH

What family stories do you carry with you? What story do you tell over and over? What landscape do you cherish the most? One of the deepest human instincts is to tell our life stories, to figure out who we are and what it means to be human. This interactive workshop led by Maura MacNeil explores how the landscapes of our lives shape the stories that we tell.

Area 23 | Concord, NH

New Hampshire Humanities presents the next program in IDEAS ON TAP, our quarterly series of pint-sized conversations about big ideas. On March 5 we’ll explore the impact of incarceration and sentencing laws in the Granite State. What does it mean to have a criminal record in New Hampshire and does the punishment always fit the crime? Join us for drinks, appetizers, and a lively community conversation in a pub-type setting. $15 per person, includes appetizers and one beverage (beer, wine, or non-alcoholic drink).

Exeter Historical Society | Exeter, NH

On first impression, the witchcraft trials of the Colonial era may seem to have been nothing but a free-for-all, fraught with hysterics. Margo Burns explores an array of prosecutions in seventeenth century New England, using facsimiles of primary source manuscripts, from first formal complaints to arrest warrants, indictments of formal charges to death warrants, and the reversals of attainder and rescinding of excommunications years after the fact; demonstrating how methodically and logically the Salem Court worked.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Marion Gerrish Community Center | Derry, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Meredith Bay Colony Club Bistro | Meredith, NH

In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women's rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement.  Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.

Thursday, March 7, 2019

NH Theatre Project West | Portsmouth, NH

New Hampshire Theatre Project kicks off the 2019 season of its popular and provocative "Elephant in the Room" series, featuring play readings followed by facilitated community conversations on subjects that we as a society often have difficulty discussing. This month, we'll use a play reading of "A Wider Circle" by Mary-Ellen Hedrick to examine the personal impact the opiod crisis has had on addicts and their families. This series is supported by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.  

Other upcoming events in the series:

Hunt Community Theatre | Nashua, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Friday, March 8, 2019

Dublin Community Church | Dublin, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions, and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution. Dublin Historical Society will host it's Annual Potluck Supper beginning at 6:00pm. Program to take place after at 7:00pm. NOTE: The snow date for this event is 3/15/2019.

Saturday, March 9, 2019

Kilton Library Community Room | West Lebanon, NH

Writers Judith Hertog, Ewa Chrusciel, and Julie Puttgen read with four new immigrant writers in a New Hampshire Humanities “New Voices” reading. All seven writers are immigrants to the Upper Valley from countries around the world.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Tucker Free Library | Henniker, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Suncook Senior Center | Allenstown, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

J.A. Tarbell Library | Lyndeborough, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions, and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

 

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Hampstead Public Library | Hampstead, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Spofford Fire Department | Spofford, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Kensington Public Library | Kensington, NH

Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

First Congregational Church | Wakefield, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Amherst Town Library | Amherst, NH

Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds.  Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary "newspapers" full of keen verbal wit. Sometimes serious, sometimes sentimental but mostly very funny, these "newspapers" were common in villages across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont and revealed the hopes, fears, humor and surprisingly daring behavior of our forebears.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Community Church of Durham | Durham, NH

This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars.

Divine Mercy Church | Peterborough, NH

A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America's first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey's Lady's Book the most influential women's magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem "Mary's Lamb" and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Portsmouth Public Library | Portsmouth, NH

African American soldiers and sailors saw extensive action during World War II in nearly every theatre of operations. Though few in number, Black submariners played an important role in manning the navy submarines, many built at Portsmouth, which wrought havoc against Japanese naval and merchant vessels. Limited by the U.S.

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Old Church Building Meeting Room | Piermont, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Bow Mills Methodist Church | Bow, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

New London Historical Society | New London, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Griffin Free Public Library | Auburn, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Littleton Public Library | Littleton, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Newmarket Public Library | Newmarket, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Red River Theatres | Concord, NH

The World Affairs Council of NH presents Finding Refuge, a three-part documentary film and discussion series funded by a New Hamsphire Humanities project grant that will explore the global refugee crisis, which has left 68.5 million people forcibly displaced worldwide. Leaving the statistics behind, we will use film as a point of entry to explore how losing your home and community profoundly changes one's sense of identity, value and belonging.

Hampstead Public Library | Hampstead, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Whipple Free Library | New Boston, NH

The Vietnam War film and discussion program utilizes short videos and a trained facilitator to prompt discussion about the Vietnam era. Content is culled from Ken Burns' and Lynn Novick's PBS documentary, THE VIETNAM WAR, which tells the story of one of the most consequential and divisive events in American history. The videos explore the human dimensions of war that still haunt us today. Witnesses from all sides give their personal testimonies-Americans who fought in the war, those who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam.

Friday, March 22, 2019

Gorham High School Library | Gorham, NH

Movies help us experience each other and the world around us, can educate and enlighten us, and can lead to meaningful and much-needed discourse. Lights, Camera, Civics! hopes to be a catalyst for such conversations.

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Cook Memorial Library | Tamworth, NH

Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

 

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

Through traditional music Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki relays some of the adventures, misadventures, and emotions experienced by Irish emigrants. The focus is on songs about leaving Ireland, sometimes focusing on the reasons for leaving (a man who is driven from his land by English persecution), sometimes revealing what happened upon arrival (an immigrant drafted into the Union army during the Civil War), and sometimes exploring the universal feeling of homesickness of a stranger in a strange land (a factory worker in London missing his home in County Clare).

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Weeks Public Library | Greenland, NH

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

 

Bedford Public Library | Bedford, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Wadleigh Memorial Library | Milford, NH

The Vietnam War film and discussion program utilizes short videos and a trained facilitator to prompt discussion about the Vietnam era. Content is culled from Ken Burns' and Lynn Novick's PBS documentary, THE VIETNAM WAR, which tells the story of one of the most consequential and divisive events in American history. The videos explore the human dimensions of war that still haunt us today. Witnesses from all sides give their personal testimonies-Americans who fought in the war, those who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam.

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Tad's Place at Heritage Heights | Concord, NH

We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile.

Kimball Public Library | Atkinson, NH

In the early 20th century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the New Hampshire program between 1902 and 1913. Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners?

Rochester Public Library | Rochester, NH

This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars.

Hooksett Public Library | Hooksett , NH

Take Scandinavian and Austrian immigrants, the Dartmouth Outing Club, the Cannon Mountain Tramway, the muscular Christian, amateur tinkerers, and Professor E. John B. Allen. Cover it with snow and shake, and you have all the makings of a unique New Hampshire history.

Madison Library | Madison, NH

Rebecca Noel explores the sometimes alarming, sometimes hilarious backstory of what we now know as gym class. Physicians worried since the Renaissance that the sedentary, scholarly life makes people sick. They focused on varying concerns over time: digestive woes, melancholy, tuberculosis, spinal curvature, reproductive weakness. The problem widened along with access to education during the Enlightenment and into the 1800s.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Epsom Public Library | Epsom, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

Saturday, March 30, 2019

Joseph Patch Library | Warren, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Rodgers Memorial Library | Hudson, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Tucker Free Library | Henniker, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Wilmot Community Association Red Barn | Wilmot, NH

In 1947, Edwin Way Teale, the most popular naturalist in the decade between Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, followed the progress of spring over four months from the Everglades to the summit of Mount Washington. His best-selling book, North with the Spring, recounts the epic journey he and his wife Nellie undertook. In 2012, John Harris set out to retrace Teale's route, stopping at unfamiliar wild places on the same calendar date on which Teale visited.

Plainfield Town Hall | Plainfield, NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.